injury

Exercising After An Injury

How do you know when to come back to exercise after an injury?

Injury is a normal part of life and it happens to everyone. You can do all you can to try and prevent injuries from happening (and these preventative measures are a great thing), but at some point people DO get injured, whether that is from playing a sport, gardening too long, rigorous travel, picking up your grandchild, or having a stressful job. 

When to Ice or Heat an Injury

"When should I use hot or cold for an injury?" is one of the most common questions I get from patients. Before we answer it, let’s first review the effects of hot and cold.

Effect of Heat
When heat is applied to a superficial area, it increases the blood flow to that region. An increase in blood flow means more nutrient is brought to the area, and thus, healing is promoted. Heat, in general, reduces the viscosity of body fluid and so improves the overall flexibility of the soft tissue.

Effect of Cold
Use of cold, on the contrary, reduces the tissue metabolic activity. Hence, it greatly reduces the swelling produced by injury. In addition, it numbs the nerve endings, and so decreases pain.

Conclusion

Injury in Musicians: Flutist

Sports injury is not a new term and everyone can understand the relationship between sports and injury. However, do you realize injury to musicians is common as well?

Association with the Amount of Practice
It may sound strange at first to hear of injuries being associated with the playing of music. But it's less difficult to understand when comparing it to marathon runners. Statistics show injuries increase tremendously when the runners run more than 19 miles a week. It's obvious there is a limit to how much physical stress our bodies can withstand before injuries occur. My daughter practices 1–2 hours a day, and she is already in pain. Many musicians practice over six hours a day, and I believe most of them live with pain to varying degrees.

What is the Physical Stress in Musicians?

How to Treat & Beat Shin Splints

After training for, or running in, one of the many races during the Christie Clinic Illinois Marathon weekend you may begin to experience common pain associated with running called shin splints. Shin splints, also known as medial tibial stress syndrome (MTSS), present themselves as pain along the tibia (the large bone in front of the lower leg). This pain can feel either dull or sharp. It is caused by improper running mechanics, repetitive pounding, or increase in exercise intensity/duration without proper progression.

Running is a repetitive, high impact movement. With as much repetition that occurs through training and racing, you may start to experience trauma or a “wearing down” of certain muscles or joints. Muscles, tendons and bone tissue may become overworked and inflammation and pain will occur.

Stay Safe While Shoveling Snow

Winter is here, and the inevitable snowfalls that accompany it. While shoveling snow can be a good exercise when performed correctly and with safety in mind, many people are shoveling with incorrect biomechanics—which put them at risk for injury.

Snow shoveling is a repetitive activity believed to cause tens of thousands of back, neck and shoulder injuries each year, ranging from muscle strain and sprains to significant medical emergencies requiring emergency room visits.

To protect yourself from potential injury, shovelers should follow these common-sense tips:

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